1960s TV Shows

November 24, 2011 Posted by admin

1960s TV Shows are some of the best television programming ever. Shows like Gunsmoke, The Andy Griffith Show, The Beverly Hillbillies, My Favorite Martian, Wagon Train, Bonanza and Star Trek topped the list of some of the best television in the 1960s.

Gunsmoke

Gunsmoke is on of the best television shows of all time. It was a western drama series that was created and directed by Norman MacDonnell. The show is set in the Kansas and most of the events in it take place around Dodge City. The events in the show occur around the time that the American West was being settled. It was such a great show that it ran for an extraordinary 20 seasons and consisted of 635 episodes. All in all, it had a great run.

The Andy Griffith Show

The Andy Griffith Show starred who else but Andy Griffith. Griffith plays a sheriff who has lost his wife in the make believe town of Mayberry in North Carolina. Barney Fife played by Don Knotts is his deputy. Fife is very well intentioned, but highly inept and this causes a lot of headaches for Griffith. Future director, Ron Howard, played Griffith’s son Opie. The show was very popular and always had a great Nielsen rating. It even won six Emmy awards which is quite an accomplishment.

The Beverly Hillbillies

The Beverly Hillbillies is about a country family called the Clampett’s who move to Beverly Hills. The patriarch of the family Jed is out hunting and a wayward shot pierces the ground in a swamp on his farm and oil gushes out. The OK Oil Company pays Jed a fortune to buy the oil from his farm and some Jed and his family become rich. They move off the farm and relocated to Beverly Hills, California. The show revolves around their difficulties and issues fitting into city life after living all their lives in the country.

My Favorite Martian

My Favorite Martian might be seen as a precursor to another popular alien series, Mork and Mindy. I get the feeling that Mork would need to see the kona coffee review, as coffee might interact with his alien physiology. Anyway, the show is about an alien from Mars that crash lands outside of Los Angeles. The Martian turns out to be an anthropologist and his crash landing is spotted by a reporter named Tim O’hara. Tim takes the Martian under his car and calls him Uncle Martin. Martin has a number of special powers like telepathy and the ability to make himself turn invisible. Martin is also a genius inventor; he even creates a time machine. But despite his abilities, it is a long a difficult struggle for him to repair his space ship so that he can return home to Mars.

Star Trek

Who could forget Star Trek, created by science fiction guru, Gene Roddenberry? It was a show that broke many barriers. For example, it featured the first interracial onscreen kiss as it boldly went where no show had gone before. It featured the adventures of the starship Enterprise (which cost so much to build that even a hedge fund salary could not afford it) as its crew explored the galaxy in search of new life and new civilizations. It starred William Shatner as the impulsive and daring Captain Kirk, Leonard Nimoy as the cold, calculating Spock and Deforest Kelly as the southern gentleman doctor McCoy.

Wagon Train

Wagon Train is another popular Western TV series from the 1960s. It starred Ward Bond as the wagon master charged with protecting his caravan of wagons as they journeys from civilized Missouri to the Wild West out in California. Set a few years after the Civil War the trademark of the show was the wagons being circled up to fend off attacks by Native Americans.

Bonanza

Yet another popular Western from the 1960s was Bonanza. Set in Lake Tahoe, Nevada, it focused on the trials and travails of the Cartwright family who lived on a one thousand square mile ranch. The patriarch, Ben Cartwright, was lost three wives and was raising children from each of these wives. Each week, the show consisted of a different adventure focusing on one of his children and how they interacted with the people around them.

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